Paisiel – self titled

paisiel

We’ve met half of Paisiel before in this parish, one Julius Gabriel. He is clearly one to watch.

The other half of Paisiel has done this percussion album which I listened to lately after one of its tracks was played on a Black Impulse show. It’s on my list of things to listen to again.

 

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Dirtmusic – Bu Bir Ruya

dirtmusic

Not feeling very talkative today. I’m off work for the next 10 days and today was probably my only chance at an actual lay in since the kids will be staying with me from now on, yet I was up before 8 to go into town and look for a cheap TV as the boy managed to ‘accidentally’ break his xbox monitor on Sunday. 10 days of him winding the girl up out of boredom does not a holiday make, so the sacrifice is worth it, I suppose.

In other news – lurgee all but gone.

Been meaning to post this album for ages. Didn’t. Doing so now.

 

The Telescopes – Hungry Audio Tapes

telescopes

Life contains an inherent unpredictability field, one of the most vital building blocks if I may be forgiven that clumsy analogy, although all the blocks are vitally important for Gestaltic reasons. But this Unpredictability Field is often – nay, always – overlooked. This is where the creative spirit comes from, those who seem more creative have a stronger manifestation of this field. One effect of this is that being with them makes life more unpredictable! Obviously.  An example here is weather forecasts. Somebody with a strong field will believe that weather forecasters are charlatans because all the predictions seem to be little better than chance added to easily observable patterns that anybody coulld work out given two functioning eyes.

An important distinction must be made here: unpredictability is not the same thing as randomness.

This is why attempts to build life are going so badly; those attempting to build are not accounting for unpredictability as it cannot be reduced to a detailed description. It has no atoms or its equivalents.

Lotto – VV

lotto

We approached the castle, our intentions clearer than our exit plan, under the cover of a cloudless sky. We sought to bring words to the wordless, but their defence of silence was much stronger than anticipated, so we tried again at a later day, under a Godless sky, bringing conversion weapons full of disposal. The fabric of our reality was thinner than our thoughts, however, and soon we were plunged into a shallow abyss, the edges as near as they were closed. We sat and reasoned, how can we escape? ‘Let’s go into the castle,’ I suggested, and the drawbridge lowered, empty of defence. In we went, no longer intentional. The king was waiting; the king and an eye. The eye spoke first, how far have you wandered? ‘We haven’t left at all,’ I said, ‘I’m still at home, what are you doing in my lounge?’

The Myrrors – Entranced Earth

myrrorsNew album from The Myrrors, is this, and it carries right on from where they left off. Whilst that may sound like a back handed compliment, it most certainly isn’t. I’d say this is my favourite of their releases to date. It’s also the one where they channel Parson Sound more explicitly than before, at least on Liberty is in the Streets and the title track. Invitation Mantra raises a hypnotic pulse that I imagine would be a great soundtrack to astral projection, so it’s about time I learnt that skill so as to test that hypothesis.

Elsewhere, they do the rustic desert jams, reminding me at times of where Evening Fires are at. In fact, the layout of the album is kind of acoustic/electric/acoustic/electric and so on – the sense is of contrasts rather than opposites, different ways of presenting a worldview. I think it is put together very well.

Their continued evolution is a joy to behold, and I’m sure the journey will continue to places unimaginable. For now, though, this is a lovely place to stop and take in the sounds.

 

Sula Bassana – Shipwrecked

sula

Sula Bassana is the guitarist in Electric Moon, who are probably my favourite practitioners of the ‘jam-band’ aesthetic. He’s a busy boy, as not only does he run Sulatron records, he actually has quite the back catalogue of solo releases, of which the above mentioned and pictured is the latest. He also plays in Krautzone and Zone Six.

He’s dropped his guitar for this one as this one is almost entirely electronic using mostly vintage (therefore analogue, presumably) instruments. The tunes have that propulsive rhythm associated with that area of the world that we’ve come to know and love, but also a really deep, meditative and trance like feel. I’m not talking Ibiza here.

Now for a bit of a rant – until the end of last year, I was happily using the word ‘krautrock.’ But now I actually think about it, I’m not going to use it. Given that the term ‘kraut’ was a derogatory term for Germans used by their enemies in the world wars, I should think it would be obvious why. I’ll stick to ‘kosmiche’ instead, for now, even though that’s in danger of getting nearly as overused as ‘psychedelic.’ Genre labels, eh? Can’t live with ’em.

Now, I wonder how the Germans actually feel about the word? I mean, one of Sula’s projects is called Krautzone. Perhaps they’ve decided not to be offended, simply decided to use/reclaim the word and let things be. Maybe the word was never offensive to start with and we weren’t imaginative enough to come up with a more offensive insult. Any Germans out there like to offer me their thoughts? There is always the distinct possibility that I’m being an over-sensitive, privileged middle class wanker here by trying to impose a ‘thou-shalt-not’ that isn’t actually necessary. But there’s always the possibility that I’m not.

Rant over.