Bardo Pond – Volume 8


Initially, we built a wall. It started off as a small wall, then it became a big wall and a thick wall and a wide wall and then people wondered whether or not we could build a wall that we couldn‟t climb or scale in any way, but we left that worry to the worriers.


One thing we did concern ourselves with, though, was just how boring the wall looked, so we started to decorate it (in practice, little people had been putting their little illustrations on already, many of them denigrative of the wall). So we split the wall up and sold off squares of it, and those squares were duly decorated with whatever the owners of those squares wished, plus that which appeared spontaneously, often in reaction.


But it was becoming apparent that the wall was costing a lot to maintain, so we started importing the bricks from south east Asia, as we had people over there, and they were able to manipulate things so that it actually became cheaper for us in purely monetary cost considerations (are there any other cons iderations to consider?) to import the bricks from Chinesia. This held for a while, and the wall grew ever higher, and its decorations became so elaborate that many observers didn‟t even realise there was a wall behind the pictures.


Soon, the pictures were all that remained in the popular memory, so we saw that as an opportunity to sell some of the more expensive bricks, as the projectors maintaining the illusions were of such high quality that they could project their nothing onto nothing itself. So we con tinued selling our bricks, slowly at first, and then more rapidly as they became more sought after, and the by now moving pictures reassured everybody that everything was fine and normal and the wall is as indomitable as ever.


But, in practice, the wall had completely gone, and the profits from the sale were draining away on keeping the projectors fed for the image parade, because, without those images, the people would realise what we had been up to, and we couldn’t let that happen, oh no, not at all.


So we made the images brighter and louder, repeating only the most successful images, and in the meantime, cast about for some new bricks


The Spacelords – Water Planet


At this point in the timeline, it seems that all is collapsing hopelessly. Yet I invite you to picture it another way – once a flower has completed its own beautiful cycle, it then produces the seed. This doesn’t look as beautiful, I grant you, but it is just as necessary if we want more flowers.

People, the time for flowers as you knew them is passing. Fortunately, we live in a time of seeds. Many, many, many, countless, not quite infinite yet neverending.

Let us nurture these seeds and see what flowers may subsequently grow from them, even as we accept those flowers may be appreciated more fully elsewhen.

Opium Eyes of Nico – Dronecaine


A Cheese & Tomato Fisting

Starring Jeremy Livestock as Laurence Bollock-Monocle


Patricia Moneylender as Miss Nervous Bosom


Alan ‘Alan’ Allen as the butler; wishproof


Scene 1: The farmer is making hay. Meanwhile, his wife is being attended to by a physicist.

Wife: ‘What am I thinking, then?’

Physicist: ‘I have no idea, dear. I study quantum mechanics. You’d be thinking of a psychic, although if you go deeply into quantum mechanics, it’s not actually so different. Have you read David Bohm?’

W: ‘My bums only red cos you slapped it so hard!’