Haram Tapes – Scorpions & Fountains

haram

This is one of those that I discovered by trying out something that one of the fans I follow on Bandcamp had bought. I have zero idea why I clicked on this one in particular, but am very glad I did.

Some of the titles are fabulous, which is why it gets to be a political album despite being largely instrumental, like the awesome Welsh drummers some posts back. But great titles are only pithy phrases unless they’re backed by something excellent to be a title to, and these things are.

Not a guitar in sight, though, for those of you who prefer my more guitar oriented posts.

Dirtmusic – Bu Bir Ruya

dirtmusic

Not feeling very talkative today. I’m off work for the next 10 days and today was probably my only chance at an actual lay in since the kids will be staying with me from now on, yet I was up before 8 to go into town and look for a cheap TV as the boy managed to ‘accidentally’ break his xbox monitor on Sunday. 10 days of him winding the girl up out of boredom does not a holiday make, so the sacrifice is worth it, I suppose.

In other news – lurgee all but gone.

Been meaning to post this album for ages. Didn’t. Doing so now.

 

JuJu – self titled

juju

Don’t forget the hinges, you might need them. Oh bugger, I left mine on the mantelpiece
–no, don’t go back, don’t worry about them. I’ve been thinking about giving them up anyway, this is as good a reason as any. I shall remain without hinges for a while
– unhinged, if you will, just to see what it’s like. I shall report back intermittently. Don’t wait up.

Maurice Louca – Benhayyi Al​-​Baghbaghan (Salute the Parrot)

mauricelouca.jpgWhilst I’m in the midst of not really listening to albums an’ ting, I do nevertheless still check the blog feeder, and every now and again Bandcamp do a post where they collect a bunch of albums together with a theme. They did this one dedicated to Nawa Recordings (who released that Alif album that I’m sure you all went and got) and from that I heard this.

This is a very groovy yet dense sonic maelstrom. It features a myriad of influences that I couldn’t begin to list, and also does the middle east/western rock fusion thing in a way that doesn’t feel forced.

Also, I love the title. Are you saluting the parrot?

Giöbia – Magnifier

giobiaAcid rock. Space rock. Stoner rock. Psych rock. All of those tags contain words which have more or less descriptive value when applied to music. It’s an imperfect system, but for all that I slag it off, I have yet to come up with a better one. Well, apart from giving a direct method to listen yourselves and thus make up your own mind.

Giöbia hail from Milano in Italy and are named after an ancient pagan festivity from Northern Italy in which a straw witch is burnt as an offering to the forces of nature – must have post-dated the arrival of patriarchy, then, unless the specifics have changed over the years regarding the sacrificial victim.

Musically, they can be summed up using the opening salvo of descriptions. They can also be compared to a collision between White Hills and Dead Meadow, with a hint of Electric Moon – though I may just be saying the latter because their albums come out via Sulatron Records. They themselves also quote an influence from 70s Italian progressive, not an area I’m familiar with so I shall take their word for it.

No further words, m’lud.

Alif – Aynama-Rtama

 alifThere’s something about the music made in and around the mediterranean area which seriously appeals to me, from the desert blues of North Africa (some of which I shall bring you at some point) to the wonderful Malayeen who I mentioned earlier this year, and many stops in between.

 The story for this album is detailed on the bandcamp page so I shan’t rehash it here. What I shall say is that I like this album so terribly, terribly much. It obviously sounds like the area it comes from, but there are also hints of Hamza El Din (could be the oud playing) and a certain bluesy feel, reminiscent at times of the why-weren’t-they-household-names Little Axe. Some of the tunes aren’t afraid to incorporate western rock leanings, too. It is yet another album that has me floundering for descriptors, which proves to me that this is the real stuff. I’ve got something brewing about that.

Love the album art, too.

Malayeen

I don’t find much about these on tinternet, though I can tell you that Malayeen are “the Lebanese trio of Raed Yassin (Keyboards, Turntables & Electronics),Charbel Haber (Electric Guitar & Electronics) and Khaled Yassine (Darbouka, Percussion).” I believe I actually first read about them over at Dusted in Exile, but can’t be bothered to trawl their archives (I am not a fan of the tumblr sites, no, not at all).

Given my general abhorrence to labelling musics these days, it probably comes as no surprise to start stumbling across music that my limited western mindset wouldn’t even know where to start in terms of classification (although I believe I may have had a rant about the notion of classification…) All I’m going to tell you is that this puts me in a trance, particularly the longer songs on the album (one of which I have linked up top), and by my definitions, that makes this music psychedelic. It also reminds me somewhat of some of the ecstatic Sufi music I’ve heard. Boy, would I love to be around that in real time.

Because I can’t find any ways of playing you the album, here’s another tune: