Las Cobras – Selva

So the other day when I went to the Cardinal Fuzz page looking for an album, I should actually have gone to Fuzz Club Records. Are they by any chance related? I think we should be told. After all, they’ve never been seen in the same photo together.

It says ‘London,’ only ‘London’ on the bandcamp page. I can be amongst the more stupid members of our race sometimes, but I strongly suspect Las Cobras don’t originate from London. I bet that’s actually Fuzz Club Records HQ. A quick and dirty net search suggests Uruguay, marking them as the first Uruguayans (to my knowledge) to land in this parish.

It sometimes puts me in mind of 80s stuff like Jesus & Mary Chain, that kind of genre, a name I do not know and do not care to. There’s been a through line of that thing all the way up to the present day so this isn’t a throwback, I’m just feeling too stupid to think of any other examples at the moment. Some of the tunes are proper good, though, and as an album it is an excellent thing to listen to.

Thee Open Sex

What do you mean, you’ve never heard of Thee Open Sex?

There are more releases than just the two I’ve linked, but they are far and away my favourite.

‘Thee Open Sex’ sounds musically like a meshing, no bleshing, of Jesus and Mary Chain, Velvet Underground, Spaceman 3, that sort of yadda. Don’t let that put you off. This is pure psychedelic rock’n’roll. Every part is perfect – the shamanic vocals, the guitar interplay (and wonderful wah sound), the tight-but-loose rhythm section, the hypnotic, pulsating, repetitive, droning rhythms… I could go on all day. I won’t. Go and have a listen.

‘Thee Open Sex is not a Put On’ is equally wonderful, but in an entirely different way. Two songs, both over twenty minutes (making it longer than ‘Thee Open Sex’) and both starting off as essentially the same damn piece. I reckon they went into a rehearsal room one day and simply pressed record whilst warming up. They called that piece ‘9/11 is a Joke.’ Afterwards, Daun Door-key (which is how the singer is listed, so it must be her true name) said ‘do that again, I’m going to join in this time,’ so they did. They called that piece ‘Santa Amanita.’

Regardless, they are wonderful compositions. In fact, the level on songcraft on both releases is astonishing. There isn’t an ounce of fat, of waste. Nothing is superfluous.

I had intended to find out a bit about them, but there doesn’t seem to be much to find out. As it happens, I think it’s better to not go looking for the biography, unless you yourself are interested enough, and you have a browser and a new tab, and off you go. The music speaks for itself.