(the) Dead Sea Flowers – Cult of Sargasso

sargasso

Imagine, right, that the human race gets wiped out in such a way as to leave behind all of our works – I dunno, a virus, really virulent, incredibly fast acting. We didn’t stand a chance. And then, as luck would have, we actually are visited by beings from another world. They land, they take a look around, they see signs of life (you know, frogs, trees, foxes, free-market cheerleaders) but no signs of yer actual intelligence. And yet, puzzlingly, there’s all these artefacts. Football stadiums, for example: what would they make of them? Factories, some of them including forklift trucks. Some of those sexy sensual temples in southern India (that’s a religion I don’t mind signing up to (typical bloke response)). Postcards. CD’s. toy aeroplanes. Real aeroplanes. Helicopters. ‘mobile phone antennae.’ Wires. Offices. Essex. Ironing boards. Et so on.

Would they recognise these as artefacts of an ancient but extinct civilisation?

I suppose it depends on their own ascent up the evolutionary ladder. It’s bound to affect their perception of what constitutes intelligence. Bit like how the Europeans were when they encountered other countries with different coloured people who did different things differently. ‘You must be savages!’ we screamed, and promptly tried to ruin them and their descendents.

In other words, how enduring are artefacts if there is no-one to explain their purpose?

Therefore, what exactly is legacy?

(Pyramids, I want me some pyramids…)

Advertisements

Bardo Pond – Volume 8

bardo8

Initially, we built a wall. It started off as a small wall, then it became a big wall and a thick wall and a wide wall and then people wondered whether or not we could build a wall that we couldn‟t climb or scale in any way, but we left that worry to the worriers.

One thing we did concern ourselves with, though, was just how boring the wall looked, so we started to decorate it (in practice, little people had been putting their little illustrations on already, many of them denigrative of the wall). So we split the wall up and sold off squares of it, and those squares were duly decorated with whatever the owners of those squares wished, plus that which appeared spontaneously, often in reaction.

But it was becoming apparent that the wall was costing a lot to maintain, so we started importing the bricks from south east Asia, as we had people over there, and they were able to manipulate things so that it actually became cheaper for us in purely monetary cost considerations (are there any other cons iderations to consider?) to import the bricks from Chinesia. This held for a while, and the wall grew ever higher, and its decorations became so elaborate that many observers didn‟t even realise there was a wall behind the pictures.

Soon, the pictures were all that remained in the popular memory, so we saw that as an opportunity to sell some of the more expensive bricks, as the projectors maintaining the illusions were of such high quality that they could project their nothing onto nothing itself. So we con tinued selling our bricks, slowly at first, and then more rapidly as they became more sought after, and the by now moving pictures reassured everybody that everything was fine and normal and the wall is as indomitable as ever.

But, in practice, the wall had completely gone, and the profits from the sale were draining away on keeping the projectors fed for the image parade, because, without those images, the people would realise what we had been up to, and we couldn’t let that happen, oh no, not at all.

So we made the images brighter and louder, repeating only the most successful images, and in the meantime, cast about for some new bricks

Lotto – VV

lotto

We approached the castle, our intentions clearer than our exit plan, under the cover of a cloudless sky. We sought to bring words to the wordless, but their defence of silence was much stronger than anticipated, so we tried again at a later day, under a Godless sky, bringing conversion weapons full of disposal. The fabric of our reality was thinner than our thoughts, however, and soon we were plunged into a shallow abyss, the edges as near as they were closed. We sat and reasoned, how can we escape? ‘Let’s go into the castle,’ I suggested, and the drawbridge lowered, empty of defence. In we went, no longer intentional. The king was waiting; the king and an eye. The eye spoke first, how far have you wandered? ‘We haven’t left at all,’ I said, ‘I’m still at home, what are you doing in my lounge?’